Creating a Bootable Windows or Linux USB Drive

If you need to install Windows or Linux and you don’t have access to a CD/DVD drive, a bootable USB drive is the solution. You can boot to the USB drive, using it to run the OS setup program, just like a CD or DVD. Here we are going to discuss about few tools which will help us in Creating a Bootable Windows or Linux USB Drive.

PS: Check our article about booting from a USB drive even if your BIOS won’t let you.

1.. Windows 7 USB/DVD Download Tool

Windows 7 USB DVD
The Windows 7 USB/DVD Download Tool is an official, freeware tool from Microsoft that allows you to install Windows 7 and Windows 8 without having to first run an existing operating system on your computer. You can change the boot order of the drives in your computer’s BIOS so the Windows 7 installation on your USB drive runs automatically when you turn on your computer. Please see the documentation for your computer for information about how to access BIOS and change the boot order of drives.

Click Here to download

2. WiNToBootic

WiNToBooticWiNToBootic is another free tool that allows you to create a bootable USB flash drive for installing Windows 7 or Windows 8. It supports an ISO file, a DVD, or a folder as the boot disk source. It’s a standalone tool that doesn’t require installation and it operates very fast.

 

Click Here to download

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3. WinToFlash

Win to flashWinToFlash is a free, portable tool that allows you to create a bootable USB flash drive from a Windows XP, Vista, Windows 7, Server 2003, or Server 2008 installation CD or DVD. It will also transfer a Windows pre-install environments (WinPE), which are handy for troubleshooting and repairs, to a USB flash drive. You can even use WinToFlash to create a MSDOS bootable USB drive.

Click here to download

4. XBoot

xbootXBoot is a free utility for creating multiboot USB flash drives or ISO image files. This allows you to combine multiple ISO files (Linux, utilities, and antivirus rescue CDs) onto one USB drive or ISO file, allowing you to create a handy utility drive. Simply drag and drop the ISO files onto the XBoot window and click Create ISO or Create USB.

NOTE: XBoot requires .NET Framework 4.0 (Standalone installer or Web installer) to be installed on your system to run.

Click here to download

5. UNetbootin

UNetbootin UNetbootin is a free program for both Windows, Linux, and Mac OS X that allows you to create bootable Live USB drives for Ubuntu, Fedora, and other Linux distributions instead of burning a CD. It runs on both Windows and Linux. Either use UNetbootin to download one of the many Linux distributions it supports or provide the location of your own Linux ISO file.

NOTE: The resulting USB drive is only bootable on PCs, not Macs.

Click here to download – Windows

Click here to download – Linux

6. Ubuntu Startup Disk Creator

Ubuntu Startup Disk CreatorThe Ubuntu Startup Disk Creator allows you to convert a USB flash drive or SD card into a drive from which you can run your Ubuntu system. You don’t have to dedicate the whole drive to the Ubuntu system. You can store other files in the remaining space.

The program also allows you to create a drive for Debian, or any other Debian-based OS for which you have a CD or .iso image.

7. Universal USB Installer

Universal USB InstallerUniversal USB Installer is a program that allows you to choose from several Linux distributions to install on a USB flash drive. Select the Linux distribution, provide a location for the appropriate ISO file, select your USB flash drive, and click Create.

NOTE: The USB flash drive must be formatted as a Fat16, Fat32, or NTFS drive.
Click here to download

 

 

8. Rufus

RufusRufus is a small, portable program that allows you to create bootable USB drives for Windows and Linux. It also allows you to check the USB device for bad blocks, using up to four passes. Rufus runs in both 32-bit and 64-bit versions of Windows XP, Windows Vista, Windows 7, and Windows 8. You can create bootable USB drives for the listed versions of Windows, as well as almost all popular Linux distributions, such as Ubuntu, Kubuntu, Fedora, and OpenSUSE.

Rufus is very easy to use and the program looks like the default format window shown in Windows when you format a hard disk partition, USB drive, or other external drive.

In addition to Windows and Linux systems, you can also use Rufus to put utilities on USB drives, such as Parted Magic, Ultimate Boot CD, and BartPE.
Click here to download

 

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